About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
MSNBCW 11
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
LINKTV 2
CSPAN 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyway we are pleased to have this occasion and have a discussion about the subjects that are in the book for foreign policy. [applause] >> thank you steve. you instrumental to make this project have been. also oxford university press that published the book and also to my:editor catherine and the people here at the foundation also jonathan who helped to make the book possible. the reason it was necessary storming off the
a more romantic idea of a monastery farm. even the monk does not fit the cliche i had in my mind. i cannot get excited about the electronic control system for grain purification. i would like to see cure little piglets instead. the father offers to show me the page. -- the pigs. this is an all organic firm bank. the pigs have a lot more space -- this is an all organic farm. he thinks have a lot more space than on a conventional farm. according to the father, if his animals are happy, he is happy, too. i get the feeling i am keeping him from his work. he asks me if there is anything else i want to know. i tell him i want to chat a little bit more. he laughs. monkught the life of a would be more calm and contemplative. he says you have to draw your strength from elsewhere to cope with the strains of everyday life. it is important to find your rest in god. the father has to attend a meeting at the monastery. he takes me back with him in the car. he has managed to get changed quickly. does he feel any different when he is wearing his have that? -- his habit? he says, no, he is just more
on a speech from washington or somebody's affair or not. it was love of the man next to you, and it's a cliche that guys jump out of the trench and run forward because of the guy to their left and right, but just because it's a cliche doesn't keep it from being true. so questions like that, i focused on he small, small part i could do something about. >> i'd echo that. the war is as small as the war for you. it's not how did you get there it's there you are, for almost every troop. and general expressing an opinion is maybe something we could use more of. what that point is it something we can't gauge. i think overall worry is if somebody is hiding so much, how much are the hiding? how much of everything is true because its an level of such high discussion. where the effect is you have to diffuse the bomb and keep 150 marines from being dead that day. does he notice? does anyone really notice? it comes down to the warrior detachment and living in a surreality, how much of the war is real to anyone not actively engaged in it on the ground. >> i'm not a veteran. but i see myself as something of
. >> you have hit the nail right on the head to use yet another cliche. the fundamental difference between the afghan forces that we spent over a decade. rag bag taliban is at that time taliban believe in what they are fighting for. they are fighting for their faith and for all sorts of other reasons too. primarily on a jihad. we expect the afghan army and police to fight for harmid karzai. >> it's not that simple though. the taliban is so brutal and the afghan people don't like them. maybe you fight against the taliban rather than for karzai. i will give colonel hunt the last word on it? >> you can the problem is insurgency. 7 to 10 years to fight. this hasn't been fought well. not just a political disaster for obama. a military because many of our four star generals did not know what they were doing. the report produced by our own military shows it didn't work and it's more than time to go because we are spending so many billions -- we also lost 988 guys since the thing started. since the start. >> bill: not good news in afghanistan. we hope the french can handle the al qaeda in mali. on
, talk to your fellow parents. talk to your kids, you know, and i don't mean to over use the cliche, but have the conversation. it is not enough to turn off the news and walk away from the tv and go, oh, that stinks. not this time. >> and it is not just republican, democratic, independent. that is the thing that has just blown my mind. that i feel like it is really not about your party right now. >> it is not, it is not. >> i really feel like it is about our children. so i would say that at this moment, that i -- my gut is telling me that we have to continue to talk about the children. they are the future of this country. and it is going to -- you know, they're going to be the next set of parents. and they would want the set of things we want. protection and safety. and you know. i think that is -- >> you know there are much larger cultural and societal issues here. i -- we can't even begin to address those because they're just so enormous. but you have to start somewhere. you have to start somewhere. and i love the idea that this group has put forward saying that sandy hook, you kn
that he could find, people to use the cliche who think out of the box. he married them up, if you will, wedded them, molded them into the information era high technology whiz people who knew how to leverage the information age to his electoral advantage. now that's what they want to do with this organize for action. and frankly, i wouldn't bet against them. this could be very, very effective as he tries to get his agenda going and maintain it. but make no mistake, we are dealing here and the country is dealing with and the republicans are dealing with a somewhat different barack obama. you could feel it today. it's been coming for some days, i think, that in the first term he was yes, sometimes timid, trying to be conciliatory. now in the way he has turned today and said give me a moment, i want to take in this view again, because i'll never see this again, he now sees this four years is going to decide what history says about what he did as president. he is already a historical figure, the first person of color to become a president and then be reelected as president, obviously. but n
as cliche. very traditional and mrs. obama has proven herself to be very untraditional when it comes to fashion. i was surprised that she chose such an expected color. >> we certainly saw that with the outfit earlier today, the dress and the coat by thom browne. you got the exclusive look at jason wu's sketch. >> did i and it is quite extraordinary to look at it. knowing jason wu and his handwriting, this is certainly him. if you can read there from the top to the bottom, it says gold embellished ring. that ring around that haltar top portion of the dress was made by kimberly mcdonald. diamond encrusted. the other notes say draped chiffon with texture, red dye to match, duchess belt and column skirt. and you can see his signature, jason wu. really, really extraordinary. and he mentioned the surprise, shock, red carpet moment where these designers don't know. and i can tell you just by looking at jason wu's tweet tonight which said #in shock. he had no idea that this was going to happen. i spoke to one of his representatives, pretty high up tonight and she told me, you know, we had an
which often gets sort of dealt with in a cliched way that you can't deal with the taliban without also simultaneously dealing with pakistan. also on the table i've talked to some former taliban commanders in doha that come in and out that are extremely frustrated with pakistan. mohammed elbaradar and how he has been treated and how he is kept out of the network of negotiations, so i know that the white house and doug lou have been in favor -- >> i want to do record keeping here. chris with the political side of your brain, which is that jay rockefeller -- >> it's most of my brain. >> five-term senator and an extraordinary leader from west virginia announced that he isn't going to run for another term. he started out as a visa volunteer in, you know, appalachiana coming from the rockefeller. he is john d. rockefeller's -- >> this is the rockefeller of the rockefeller. >> he is the fourth. you know, he is -- i have to just say an extraordinary senator. i covered him as a senator. i know him as well, you know, in washington all of these years, and this is another great loss for the old gu
is as a ocd self editor is how often really cliches will show up. and to me that is something i think if you just took even a mediocre speech, trimmed out the troeps, the comforting words, you know, then, you know, suddenly the thing, there are not enough words. you have to substitute in. maybe those are more truthful. but like in orwell's politics in language, certain are markers for insincerity and for an agenda. >> the word frankly, for instance. which is my favorite. >> honestly. >> yeah. >> the sort of familiar catch phrases you almost don't even read in a speech anymore. but i think what you notice in that clip is there was nothing. there was literally not a single one of those that was an originality of an expression and like that goosebumps the quickness with which a certain rhetorical trope came home. wow, that was perfect. that was fast. you know, that is something -- that's hard to talk about, i suppose. but language is power. and, you know, in that, you can really see it. >> he said that obviously he gave that speech after the reverend wright stuff blew up. one of the things that
will be on display. let go of the cliche of the boys' club. among the 100,000 or more who flooded south beech this weekend, meet two women, some of the most outspoken superfans here. >> we bleed blue and gold. >> reporter: molly's father, a former halfback for notre dame. >> my dad played football for notre dame. my grandfather played for knute rockne. >> reporter: for her, football is more than game. it's a tradition. a way of life. >> notre dame is about family. friendship. faith. it's that community that unites us and sustains us. that's why there's such a great following. >> reporter: janice bleeds football, too. hers runs alabama crimson. her father played for the tide. she's one of four generations of family who have attended the university. >> i've loved football all my life. not just because my dad was an all-american and i was raised in it. it's just an awesome sport. a good way for us all to come together. >> reporter: the only thing they disagree upon who will hoist the coveted trophy. >> go irish! >> roll, tide! >> and you can watch tig best of all games tonight on espn, full cove
the cliche because the consequences would be too large, and congress, unfortunately, dealt with the first half, the tax policy, the tax code, and now there's equal more uncertainty with what they do around reform, and it's just a huge question mark. we've been looking to congress to wrap it up cleanly and produce what we've been referring to as a stimulus dividend to boost optimism in the economy, but they are not off to a strong start. ashley: all right. sectors you think that have positive results? which ones do you like? >> consumer discretionary and financials supposed to be strong this year, but that's predicated on the economy building momentum on the housing sector, and, really, we're thinking a cautious view. the s&p could be at 1600 this year. ashley: okay. >> based on more of the same. the economy continues to grow at -- ashley: bumbling along. >> at 2%, exactly. when everything's said and done, it's called "the cliff," but it's tightening, fiscal tightening. what offsets tightening? the ben bernanke fed doing everything they can. they went all in on housing. we're looking to si
and keeping their powder dry if i can cram some cliches in there. it's unusual to do an interview when you're awaiting confirmation. you're supposed to do an immediate blackout. he chose his hometown newspaper to do it. while do we care about this as a political story, will he be confirmed or not? everybody thinks in the end he will be. senator schumer is key here. a democratic nominee who doesn't have a scandal or personal scandal, all about policy, very rare to beat somebody just on policy, particularly if it stays an inside game. are there people in washington, in elite circles who want to stop hagel? absolutely. is the public engage on this? no way, not now. the challenge for the people who oppose is to do one of two things, either get the public engaged and say we want to stop chuck hagel, unlikely or pick off a prominent democratic senator who says i can't support this person. schumer is the key. if schumer supports hagel, almost impossible to stop him. >> i have to say, not to -- i feel like this is all - all -- especially the extreme opposition here, it's kind of a waste of time. t
? there was no guarantee we were going to defeat hitler or that britain was going to survive. it has become a cliche, but it has not been said here tonight, so i will be the one to say. my favorite quote from winston churchill, the americans can always be. -- depended on to do the right thing, after they had exhausted every other possibility. the demographics are irreversible and will ultimately drive the right and the left to the reality that we have to make some kind of changes. >> you are our realist. how do you think this ends? >> of course, the honest answer is i don't know. what i worry about, and i really appreciate the reminder of history, because i think is really important, and we forget history too often. what i worry about is the trust deficit. if you look at every institution, business, congress, sports figures, the church -- it doesn't matter what it is. no one trusts the institutions that operate in our country. and congress is not doing so well. >> why does that matter? it matters because, for a society to be vibrant and grow and take risks and innovate, we not only need to like each
exercise. it's a lifestyle change. it's kind of cliche, but it truly is. >> so there's no shortcuts. >> no, there aren't. look, it's very simple. it's less going in and more exercise. >> is it a challenge, though, every day? >> oh, yeah. >> but have you changed your lifestyle? >> i've changed, but it's still work. again -- and my wife, deborah roberts, who's on 20/20 and abc, she's a person who eats, but she's a size 4. she works out. she runs. there's a certain mindset, i think, that naturally thin people have that those of us who are not don't have. we were at the chicago airport a few weeks ago coming home, and we're walking down one of the terminals. and we're walking by a mcdonald's, and i went, ooh, mcrib is back. she didn't even see that sign, but i saw mcrib is back. >> probably some beautiful picture. >> my old friend, mcrib. hello, mcrib, i've missed you so. >> what i think is fun is that you actually use d food to woo your then friend into being your fiancee. >> deborah was going off to do the olympics and asked me -- look, we're friends. she's a beautiful woman. we're friends.
, on the positives. it's a huge cliche to say this, but really happiness resides inside of us, not outside of us. >> here with more on the pursuit of happiness is gretchen ruben, best selling memoir, "happy at home." happy new year. >> happy new year. >> why is it so elusive, happiness? >> it's something we strive for and if we don't get the things we want, it doesn't make us happy, which we expect. things like anxiety, remorse, guilt, fear. these things are big flashing signals we need to change something in our lives. even negative emowings have an important role to play in a happy life. >> when people define happiness, they tend to define it in terms of a perfect life and it can never happen? >> exactly. i think it's helpful to be happier, not achieve some myth iccal goefl a happy life or achieving perfect happiness but thinking today, next week, next month, what can i do to be happier? >> one of the ladies in the piece, one of the women in the piece said sometimes you have to stop and think about what you do have, not what you don't have. i've been through difficult times in my life and ofte
cliche, but i was seeing a lot of it. and in our game, you know, and you've been around me long enough to know, i want our guys to care about each other fiercely. that's why the '04 team worked so well. we didn't have a ton of rules. but when the game started, they knew what they were doing and they cared about each other. and i saw stuff that i didn't think gave saw stuff that i did think gave us their best chance to win and i wanted to tell them that. and i walked back to my office, and said, they didn't grasp it, they didn't listen. they were just wondering why i had a meeting. >> this book calls mike barnicle a boston multi-media personality. that's questionable. >> we had to give him some liberty. >> so there are great baseball fans all over the country, but boston is special. red sox nation is different. what are the fans like? what is the pressure like for a manager in boston that's not like any place else? >> if you like baseball, it's an unbelievable place to work. there's passion, there's interest. along with that comes a headache every once in a while. because there's no lit
was really -- in the '90s, i was the cliche actress/waitress/dog walker, you know, all of it. i was very lonely. i was very hungry. i was eating mcdonald's like $2 specials every day. and i thought, oh, my god, i think i made a serious mistake, even though i loved what i was doing. i was confused and my mother, who is a very gifted astrologier, did my chart and she was saying if you can hold out and if you can keep your will, everything is going to change in your favor. and long story short, it did. and in a very small period of time, i got an agent and i did a play and a movie. though i wasn't making any money, it really brought me to realize that i was in the right path. >> you've been rewarded now with the success of this show. we saw some of the problems you have at home. now apparently this season things get even more interesting at work with a bit of a love triangle, is that right? >> yes. there's a love triangle. it's at work. it's at home. and it's something that i think the audience really -- there's a lot of team nico and team matt, which i love. i like old school love triangle
right, and i think that falls in the phase zero. you have to have skip in the game, i know it's a cliche, but if you're not there present, then the asians question extraordinarily why you're going to come in when the stakes get much higher, and they don't even need to think out to the existential question of soviet -- chinese icbms just hoping for the good old days hoping things were much clearer, chinese icbms raining down on them and does the nuclear umbrella still hold? as you point out, we've already been doing offshore balancing even while being present because we've had the filipinos, the japanese come to us in these territorial disputes and say are you backing us up, and what are you doing? the administration's response has been we take no position on sovereignty issues, we want to see the status quo maintained, but it's up to you to solve it. now i think, ironically, the right position. it's not for us to defend ya pap's territory, but it is for us to understand how the balance of power in the region is changing, and by not reacting we are changing the actions of our allies. and
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)